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Klausur "Literature and Culture I"

Date: 
11. Feb 11:00 - 13:00

HS 1

Klausur "Ethnicity & Diversity"

Date: 
08. Feb 11:00 - 13:00

HS 2

Mündliche Staatsexamensprüfungen in amerikanischer Literatur- und Kulturwissenschaft

Mündliche Staatsexamensprüfungen in amerikanischer Literatur- und Kulturwissenschaft

Die Prüfungsthemen werden mit den entsprechenden Prüfer*innen in einer Konsultation (während der Sprechzeiten) abgesprochen. Dabei werden i.d.R. folgenden Umfänge erwartet:

201823Oct

Prof. Kanzler Interviewed by LUMAG

Leipzig University's LUMAG spoke to Prof. Katja Kanzler about her work, her plans for the literature professorship, and her views on literature and American (popular) culture. You can read the full interview on the LUMAG homepage (only within the campus network) or via the attached PDF.
 

201822Oct

Office Hours During Winter Semester 2018/19

Prof. Garrett

Tuesdays, 4-6 pm, and by Appointment
 

Prof. Pisarz-Ramírez

Wednesdays, 1-2 pm (on 24 Oct. from 2 - 3 pm)
 

Prof. Kanzler

Tuesdays, 2 - 3 pm
 

Dr. Herrmann

Mondays, 3-4 pm
 

Dr. Schmieder

Tuesdays, 12:00-13:00
 

Dr. Schubert

Tuesdays, 3-4 pm

 

201822Oct

Prof. Pisarz-Ramirez´ Office Hours postponed

On Wednesday, 24 Oct., Prof. Pisarz-Ramírez´ Office Hours have to be postponed to 2 - 3 pm.

Anne Keyselt
ASL Secretariat

201816Oct

iTASK Professional Seminar starts October 24th

Due to the University's Immatrikulationsfeier on Weds, October 17th starting at 3 PM, Professor Garrett's iTASK Professional Seminar begins on October 24th.

Sophie Spieler

 

User Foto
Dr. Sophie Spieler
Assistant Lecturer for American Studies
Room 3503 | Phone: (0341) 97-37337
Office Hours: Tuesdays, 12-1 pm (Summer Term 2019)

http://americanstudies.uni-leipzig.de/faculty/spieler
sophie.spieler@uni-leipzig.de
 

Bio

Born in Kiel; studied German, English, and American Studies in Greifswald, Dresden, and Fairfield, CT (2006-2012). Doctoral studies at the Graduate School of the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies (2013-2017, title of dissertation: “The Wealthy, the Brilliant, the Few: The Discourse of Elite Education in 21st-Century America”).

201815Oct

ASL Welcomes Prof. Katja Kanzler as New Chair for American Literature

American Studies Leipzig is delighted to announce that Prof. Katja Kanzler has assumed the position of Professor for American Literature at the institute. As previously indicated, Prof. Kanzler accepted Leipzig University’s offer to join ASL earlier this year, and she will start teaching classes in our BA and MA programs as the winter semester begins this week.

Fun in Postbellum American Culture

Postdoctoral Project by
Sophie Spieler

The United States can be described, without running the risk of controversy, as a nation that for the better part of the twentieth century has privileged, demanded, and celebrated ‘fun’ in its cultural self-performances. I want to propose, however, that the conditions for this triumphant proliferation of ‘fun’ were created during the last decades of the nineteenth century. The aim of this project, then, is to investigate the emergence of a culture of fun in Postbellum America, by examining nascent infrastructures and discourses of fun along with their larger implications for American self-conceptualizations during and after that period. My approach is grounded in discourse theory and aims at including a diverse range of sources, for instance memoirs and diaries, literary texts, newspaper articles and trade journals, and advertisements.

A number of factors shaped the institutionalization and solidification of fun as a cultural imperative and will thus serve as analytical axes of my inquiry: the emergence of industrial capitalism and the concomitant consolidation of a market-driven economy; the rise of a mass culture of consumers along with the technological innovations that enabled it; and the unprecedented levels of immigration that, in addition to the trauma of the Civil War, informed national anxieties as well as attempts to alleviate them by generating collective understandings of Americanness.

I assume that ‘fun’ is distinct from, though always related to, semantically similar concepts such as leisure, recreation, play, and entertainment. Contrasted alternately with boredom, seriousness, work, or compulsion, fun is a multidimensional category that can be conceptualized as a social and affective experience as well as a practice or performance. Fun can also, in some contexts, be understood as political action: a form of protest or resistance. Regardless of the specifics, fun is furthermore always embedded in and informed by social hierarchies and the opportunities and restrictions they create—what kind of fun is had, in which contexts, and with what consequences depends on the particularities of the gendered, racialized, and classed body that experiences it. In this multiplicity, fun offers a diverse and productive, yet nevertheless distinctive point of departure to engage with late-nineteenth century cultural history.

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